Arthritis Center
En Español (Spanish Version)

General Overview
The term arthritis literally means joint inflammation, but it also is used to refer to more than 100 rheumatic diseases. These diseases can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in joints and may also affect other parts of the body.

InDepth
Find answers in our in-depth reports on arthritis:

Diagnostic and Surgical Procedures
Living With Arthritis


Help for hip pain
When your hip joint begins to break down, you're in for constant pain. It wakes you up at night and curtails most of your physical activities during the day. Fortunately, there are a number of treatment options that can greatly improve this chronic, painful condition.

 
Special Topics

Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form of arthritis. So common, in fact, that if you are over 40, there is a 90% chance you already show signs, though you probably don't know it. Find out if there are supplements that may provide relief.


Ceramic hip replacement devices
For people who have suffered through years of hip pain and discomfort, hip replacement surgery can change their lives.

True or False?
True or false: changes in the weather can make your joints stiff or achy
For many people, the flare-up of an arthritic knee or shoulder appears to signal a change in the weather—usually hinting that a storm is imminent. Are the two really related?

True or false: cracking your knuckles can lead to arthritis
If you cracked your knuckles as a child, you may have been warned that it could cause you to develop arthritis later in life. Is this true?

Related Conditions
Natural and Alternative Treatments (By Condition)
Resources
The American College of Rheumatology

The Arthritis Foundation

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)




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This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

 

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